East Riding Flag

Free To Use High Res East Riding Flag UK-Yorkshire East Riding

The East Riding flag was registered on the UK Flag Registry on Thursday 18 April 2013 after the unfurling at Beverley Minster. The unfurling was attended by the Lord- Lieutenant, the Vice Chairman of East Riding of Yorkshire Council and the Chairman of North Yorkshire County Council. At the unfurling my address outlined the background to the East Riding flag.

East Riding Flag

The flag is described as: “The white rose is displayed in the East Riding style. The blue represents the sea and the maritime activities. The green represents the rich agricultural land.” Additionally, the blue hoist colour signifies the East Riding’s connection to the whole of Yorkshire whilst the green is placed towards the fly to represent its position in the east of the county.

Although the Lord Mayor of Hull City Council was unable to attended the unfurling he provided the following statement: “happy to note that the East Riding is recognised with its own flag”.

The Lord Mayor of the City of York Council sent his best wishes for an enjoyable and successful event and unfurling.

The East Riding flag was designed by Trevor and Thomas Appleton (a father and son), from Kirkburn, East Riding.

The flag was chosen by a public vote, following a competition to design a flag for the East Riding which was launched on Monday 7 January 2013 on BBC Radio Humberside. Six designs were selected from numerous entries, by a panel of judges, for everyone to vote for their favourite design.

Purchasing East Riding Flags

The first East Riding flag was made by Flying Colours of Knaresbrough. Printed and hand-made East Riding flags can now be purchased from them.

World Flag Shop expect delivery of polyester economy East Riding flags around Wednesday 8 May. They will be 5ft x 3ft and cost – £6.25 + p&p.

East Riding Boundary Walk

On Sunday 21 July I set off from Spurn Point to start my walk around the East Riding boundary with the original East Riding flag. I will undertake the walk in stages as time permits.

East Riding Walk Start 2

History of the East Riding Flag

The following is reproduced by kind permission of British County Flags.

The term “riding” originally a “thriding” is derived from the old Norse “thrithjungr” meaning a third part and is a legacy of the Viking settlement of Yorkshire in the ninth century. Yorkshire’s vast size meant that its three divisions of the North, West and East Ridings, which were each of comparable size to other counties, also functioned effectively as counties, with separate legal proceedings, “Quarter Sessions” and separate Lieutenancies. Accordingly, when modern local government was established in 1889 each of the Ridings was awarded an administrative council maintaining their effective status as counties in their own right, there was never a “Yorkshire County Council”!

These councils, along with the ancient lieutenancies, were abolished in 1974 and then a local government area named “East Riding of Yorkshire Council” was created in 1996, whose remit however does not cover the full territory of the East Riding and in fact includes areas from the West Riding. In the midst of these administrative upheavals many might have thought that the East Riding as an entity in its own right had disappeared but it has not. The Ridings have existed for a thousand years and have never been subject to any legal abolition, irrespective of endlessly redefined administrative arrangements.

While the East Riding Council bore its own arms between 1945 and 1974

EAST RIDING COUNCIL ARMS

there had never been a flag raised for the East Riding. In 2013, as part of an ongoing campaign to remind people of the continued existence of this traditional division of the county of Yorkshire, local resident and adventurer Andy Strangeway organised a competition, in cooperation with the Flag Institute, to establish one. This came in the wake of 2012 `legislation regarding flag flying in the UK which specifically referenced “… the flag of….  any Riding of Yorkshire….”, seemingly an open invitation to create flags for them. The competition was duly launched by Andy Strangeway on BBC Radio Humberside on January 7th 2013.

The winning flag was one of six designs selected by a panel of judges for a final public vote. It was created by father and son, Trevor and Thomas Appleton from Kirkburn and unfurled on April 18th 2013 at Beverley Minster at a ceremony attended by the Lord-Lieutenant of the East Riding, the Vice Chairman of East Riding of Yorkshire Council and the Chairman of North Yorkshire County Council.

East Riding Flag Unfurling

Although the Lord Mayor of Kingston upon Hull City Council was unable to attend the unfurling he provided the following statement: “happy to note that the East Riding is recognised with its own flag”. The Lord Mayor of the City of York Council sent his best wishes for an enjoyable and successful event and unfurling.

The flag features a Yorkshire white rose, displayed in the East Riding style with one sepal at the top, set against a bi-colour of blue at the hoist, representing the sea and the historic maritime activities of the East Riding and green in the fly symbolising the locality’s rich agricultural land. Additionally, the blue hoist colour signifies the East Riding’s connection to the whole of Yorkshire whilst the green is placed towards the fly to represent its position in the east of the county.

Occasionally one may encounter depictions of an armorial banner inaccurately described as the flag of the “East Riding” or the “Flag Of East Yorkshire” or similar,

1996 BANNER 2 1996 BANNER 1

This is derived from the coat of arms borne by the present “East Riding of Yorkshire Council”

1996 C OF ARMS

and in fact represents only the post 1996 East Riding of Yorkshire Council and may not be used by anyone else. It does not represent the traditional East Riding and was not designed with this purpose in mind. Its complicated heraldic patterning in fact makes this a singularly inappropriate design for use as a flag.

Yorkshire – East Riding Terminology

Yorkshire One of the 92 counties of ancient origin which for centuries formed, and continue to form, a commonly agreed way of referring to the different parts of the United Kingdom. Existed for over 1,000 years to the present day. Yorkshire is the three Ridings and the City of York. Yorkshire is a traditional/historic county.

East Riding (of Yorkshire) “Riding” is “thrithing” – a Viking word meaning a third part. There are three Ridings East, North and West. In 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972 East Riding ceased to carry out administrative functions. Existed for over 1,000 years to the present day. The East Riding is one of the three Ridings of the traditional/historic county of Yorkshire.

East Yorkshire An administrative district created by the local Government Act 1972 solely “for the administration of local government”.  Existed from 1981 to 1996. (Between 1974 and 1981 the district was called North Wolds) East Yorkshire was an administrative District in the county of Humberside.

East Riding of Yorkshire Is the name of a unitary local government area created in 1996. It is also the name of a lieutenancy area or ceremonial county which comprises the local government areas of East Riding of Yorkshire and Kingston upon Hull. Existed from 1996 to present day. East Riding of Yorkshire is an administrative area.

Useful Links

British County Flags

East Riding of Yorkshire Society

Flag Institute

UK Flag Registry